November 11, 2013



 

 NEWSWIRE SNIPPETS

Polyethylene prices were mostly steady. Despite the rolled-over $.05/lb increase still on the table, Nov contracts will likely be steady at best and some erosion is possible. Trader demand is soft; resellers are generally weary of high priced purchases into November without customer orders already secured.

LLDPE holding pattern "PE market activity remained below average and prices mostly held steady."

Stretch for relief "Market sentiment is cautiously a bearish and buyers remain hopeful for price relief during November and/or December; producers however, have maintained pricing power as they have throughout most of 2013"

PE costs impacted I "Dec Natural Gas prices were pummeled again"

PE costs impacted II "The Ethylene market moved higher in fairly active trading."

LLDPE again rolls flat "Polyethylene prices were mostly steady; supply price remains relatively snug due to remaining production issues. Despite the rolled-over $.05/lb increase still on the table, Nov will likely be steady at best and some erosion is possible. Demand is soft;

"Polyethylene could see a little relief this month; there is plenty of margin to be shared"

Packaging Sources October 2013

Chem Data Report -
The October CDI report shows flat for October 2013 LLDPE

Keep up to date on LLDPE, PVC pricing developments.
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Support for higher resin prices -

Exxon Mobil's third-quarter profit falls 18 percent. Production is slightly higher, but the biggest U.S. oil and gas company is making less money at refining because of thinner profit margins.


Dow Chemical the largest U.S. chemical maker , reported third-quarter profit that trailed analysts’ estimates as the firm encountered higher costs and lower sales volumes.

Trade News October 2013

In response to the September 1st resin increase, all new orders received on or after September 30th will be priced at a 7% increase. Read Letter (
Sigma) (Amtopp) (AEP) (Western Plastics) (Paragon ) (IPG) (Berry)
U.S. Stretch Film Producers September 2013

Western Plastics continues to offer a range of down gauged, high performance films designed to keep your film costs low.
The expanded HYBRiD80 line of film is available in:.

HYBRiD80
Banding Films
HYBRiD80
Hand and Machine Films
HYBRiD80
Wide Web Films
HYBRiD80
Color Films
HYBRiD80
Extended Core Films

 

As seen at PACK EXPO


HYBRiD80 plus
Multi-layer Engineered Pallet wraps

October 22, 2013

Why You Should Weigh and Stretch Wrap Together: Reason #2




Did you get caught speeding this morning? Probably not. But did your speedometer hit 70 in a 60 mph zone? Probably so. Just like cops, take a look at how less-than-truckload freight carriers crack down on weight.
 
Posted by Whitney Morris on Wed, Oct 09, 2013 @ 09:35 AM

You're going to get caught.

October 07, 2013

Why You Should Weigh and Stretch Wrap Together: Reason #1

Posted by Whitney Morris on Thu, Oct 03, 2013 @ 10:08 AM

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be posting 5 tips on why you should weigh and stretch wrap at the same time. Hint: you’ll save money. Did we get your attention? At the end of the series, these tips will be compiled into a downloadable e-book. You’ll print it out, pass on your new found knowledge and quickly become the most popular guy in the office. Right? We think so.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be posting 5 tips on why you should weigh and stretch wrap at the same time. Hint: you’ll save money. Did we get your attention? At the end of the series, these tips will be compiled into a downloadable e-book. You’ll print it out, pass on your new found knowledge and quickly become the most popular guy in the office. Right? We think so.


EBook Spilled Beer no background crop

October 01, 2013

Stretching Film's Limits : Plastics Technology

Stretching Film's Limits : Plastics Technology

In the hyper-competitive stretch-film market, more layers often mean more market share. Moving from five layers to seven or nine can give an edge through higher performance or reduced cost.
Click Image to Enlarge
Downgauging and sophisticated structures make today's stretch film go farther. Pliant's newest seven layer line puts 9,000 ft of 51-gauge stretch film on a foll, vs. only 5000 ft of conventional 80-gauge film.
Making seven-layer film with high mLLDPE content at high output rates requires North America's largest-diameter cast chill roll. (Photo: Pliant)
Pinnacle Films makes only seven-layer, high-performance stretch films using mLLDPE. Last year it added a second seven-layer line.
High-performance seven-layer films can stretch farther than most wrapping machines can pull them, even on a load like this with protruding corners. (Photo: Highlight Industries)
The world's first nine-layer stretch-film line at Sigma Stretch Films doesn't use mLLDPE. Its extra layers create a commodity film less expensively.
Automatic core loading, roll unloading, and boxing is more prevalent in Europe, where labor costs are higher. (Photo: SML)
Stretch-film processors were used to a market that doubled every five years. Between 1985 and ’90, demand grew from 250 million lb/yr to 500 million lb, and from 1990 to ’95 it swelled to 1 billion lb. Even as recently as five years ago when five-layer stretch film swept the market, resin demand still grew in double digits. But for the past couple of years, stretch-film resin demand stalled at around 1.4 billion lb. Stretch film is 65% to 70% cast film, mostly for machine wrapping, and 30% to 35% blown film, mostly for commodity hand wrap and a few highly puncture-resistant specialty films.
Any views expressed on this blog are mine.